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Sweet-shooting Jordan Nwora of Louisville declares for the 2020 NBA Draft

Jordan Nwora, one of the most prolific scorers over the last two seasons in college basketball (17.5 points per game), has declared for the 2020 NBA Draft. Nwora, a 6-foot-7 forward, will forgo his final season of eligibility at Louisville and remain in the draft.

As a junior, Nwora ranked second in the ACC in scoring: 18 points per game on 52.8 percent effective shooting. During his three seasons in college, Nwora drained 178 3-pointers (39.4 3P%).

At times this year, Nwora showcased an improved athletic burst; however, it didn’t necessarily translate into improved numbers. Nwora’s stocks number dropped (1.3 percent steal rate and 0.9 percent block rate), slightly, though it should be noted that he plays in a Pack Line defense at Louisville. Nwora shot 60.2 percent at the rim; a year ago, that number hovered to just over 63 percent.

Nwora’s best finishes at the rim came in transition, too. According to Synergy Sports, Nwora shot under 49 percent at the hoop from the half court.

In his quest to improve his one-on-one scoring, Nwora attempted more long 2s this season. Interestingly enough, a high percentage of Nwora’s makes at the rim were assisted this season: 48.4 percent, up from 39.8 percent.

 

Quick Thoughts: the pro potential of Jordan Nwora

An intriguing movement shooter, Nwora’s stock as a prospect rests on his ability to make shots. He’s not super long, but Nwora brings some size to the wing (and a high defensive rebound rate); he could masquerade as a small-ball 4 in some NBA lineups. Most likely, though, his future will land at the 3 on the next level.

As a shot creator, Nwora is limited. His handle is average (at best) and he never showed much power when Louisville gave him an occasional post touch. Nwora could be turned over when he tried to create his own shot. He’s most comfortable off the bounce when he can settle in for a step-back, but even then, he doesn’t create a ton of space.

The ability to guard one-on-one is another area Nwora must improve. As a team defender, Nwora is mostly fine to pretty good. But his ability to guard in space against some of the twitchiest athletes on the planet could stress some of his defensive capabilities.

Fortunately for Nwora, he is a big-time range shooter, with some microwave-scorer tendencies. According to Synergy, Nwora posted an effective shooting clip of 66.5 percnet on catch-and-shoot attempt this season. That’s a monster number: No. 22 nationally among players with 100+ FGA.

With his frame and shooting abilities, there’s appeal to Nwora as a second-round prospect in 2020.